National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Wallops Flight Facility

Rennick 01

OIB successfully completed the “Rennick 01” land ice mission today, with extremely good weather (blue skies and sunshine) and no significant winds or turbulence. The mission took us towards the eastern side of our Antarctic targets today.  This mission also contained spectacular scenery as NASA 5 flew a number of lines up and down the longitudinal axis of the glacier. The OIB ATM instruments suite and the CReSIS radars once again ran nominally and collected good data, but there was an issue with the LDEO gravimeter instrument on the transit home (after the low level survey) which was under investigation post-flight.

Tomorrow OIB will check weather again and attempt a mission if possible.

Global view of our flight track today

Detail of flight track today

NASA JSC aircraft maintainer Angel, Deputy Project Scientist Linette Boisvert, and Mission Manager Eugenia De Marco on the ramp this morning.

Approaching the short (~100 feet high) calving front of Rennick Glacier

Wiki note:
Rennick Glacier: Rennick Glacier is broad glacier, nearly 200 miles (320 km) long, which is one of the largest in Antarctica. It rises on the polar plateau westward of Mesa Range and is 20 to 30 miles (32 to 48 km) wide, narrowing to 10 miles (16 km) near the coast. It takes its name from Rennick Bay where the glacier reaches the sea. The seaward part of the glacier was photographed by U.S. Navy (USN) Operation Highjump, 1946-47. The upper reaches of the Rennick Glacier were discovered and explored by the U.S. Victoria Land Traverse (VLT) in February 1960, and the first ascent made of Welcome Mountain by John Weihaupt, Alfred Stuart, Claude Lorius and Arnold Heine of the VLT party. On February 10, 1960, Lieutenant Commander Robert L. Dale, pilot of U.S. Navy (USN) Squadron VX-6, evacuated the VLT from 7238S, 16132E, on this glacier, and then conducted an aerial photographic reconnaissance to Rennick Bay on the coast before returning the VLT team to McMurdo Station.

Bowers Mountains: (71°10′S 163°15′E) is a group of north-south trending mountains in Antarctica, about 145 km (90 mi) long and 56 km (35 mi) wide, bounded by the coast on the north and by the Rennick, Canham, Black and Lillie glaciers in other quadrants. The seaward end was first sighted in February 1911 from the Terra Nova, under Lt. Harry L.L. Pennell, RN, and was subsequently named “Bowers Hills” in honour of Henry Robertson Bowers who perished with Captain Robert Falcon Scott on their return from the South Pole in 1912. The mountain range is one of the most extensive topographical features within Victoria Land. The feature was photographed from U.S. Navy aircraft in 1946-47 and 1960–62, and was surveyed and mapped by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) in 1962-63. The name was amended to Bowers Mountains upon USGS mapping which showed the group to be a major one with peaks rising to nearly 2,600 metres. The major topographical feature lies situated within the Pennell Coast region of Victoria Land, Antarctica.

Bowers Mountains

Frolov Ridge in the Bowers Mountains

The Litell Rocks (71°24′S 162°0′E) are an area of rock outcrops within the lower Rennick Glacier, Antarctica, located 5 nautical miles (9 km) east of the north end of the Morozumi Range. They were mapped by the United States Geological Survey from ground surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960–62, and were named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Richard J. Litell, a public information officer with the National Science Foundation, who served in four summer seasons in Antarctica, 1960–64.

Mt Lugering: Mountain nearly 2,000 m high on the W side of Lanterman Range, Bowers Mountains. It marks the N side of the terminus of Hunter Glacier where it joins Rennick Glacier. Mapped by USGS from ground surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960-62. Named by US-ACAN for utilitiesman Donald R. Lugering, USN, of the South Pole Station winter party, 1965.

Mt Lugering ridge

Znamenskiy Island: A high, nearly round, ice-covered island 2.5 mi long, lying in Rennick Bay just N of the terminus of Rennick Glacier. Charted by the SovAE in 1958 and named for Soviet hydrographer K.I. Znamenskiy (1903-41).

Bowers Mountains

Frolov Ridge (70°45′S 162°9′E) is a prominent ridge about 11 nautical miles (20 km) long, trending north–south, located just west of Arruiz Glacier in the Bowers Mountains of Victoria Land, Antarctica. It was photographed from the air by U.S. Navy Operation Highjump, 1946–47, was surveyed by the Soviet Antarctic Expedition in 1958 and was named after V.V. Frolov, a Soviet polar investigator, and director of the Arctic and Antarctic Scientific Research Institute.[1] The ridge lies situated on the Pennell Coast, a portion of Antarctica lying between Cape Williams and Cape Adare.

Frolov Ridge

One of the side glaciers in the Bowers Mountains, possible Arruiz Glacier. Named by US-ACAN for Lt. Alberto J. Arruiz, Argentine IGY observer, a Weather Central meteorologist at Little America V in 1958.

One of the mountains beside Rennick Glacier and windswept ice in the foreground

Onlooker Nunatuk: An isolated nunatak which protrudes prominently above the ice of the Rennick Glacier just SE of Morozumi Range. Named by the northern party of NZGSAE, 1963-64. The name is suggestive of the aspect of the feature.

Tenterhook Crevasses in foreground

Tenterhook Crevasses: A large system of crevasses in the Rennick Glacier between the Morozumi and Lanterman Ranges. The southern part of these crevasses (near Onlooker Nunatak) was traversed with great difficulty by members of the Northern Party of the NZGSAE, 1963-64, who gave the name.

Bowers Mountains (71°10′S 163°15′E) is a group of north-south trending mountains in Antarctica, about 145 km (90 mi) long and 56 km (35 mi) wide, bounded by the coast on the north and by the Rennick, Canham, Black and Lillie glaciers in other quadrants. The seaward end was first sighted in February 1911 from the Terra Nova, under Lt. Harry L.L. Pennell, RN, and was subsequently named “Bowers Hills” in honour of Henry Robertson Bowers who perished with Captain Robert Falcon Scott on their return from the South Pole in 1912. The mountain range is one of the most extensive topographical features within Victoria Land.
The feature was photographed from U.S. Navy aircraft in 1946-47 and 1960–62, and was surveyed and mapped by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) in 1962-63. The name was amended to Bowers Mountains upon USGS mapping which showed the group to be a major one with peaks rising to nearly 2,600 metres. The major topographical feature lies situated within the Pennell Coast region of Victoria Land, Antarctica.

Bowers Mountains

USARP Mountains: A major Antarctic mountain chain, lying westward of the Rennick Glacier and trending N-S for about 120 miles. The feature is bounded to the north by Pryor Glacier and the Wilson Hills. Its important constituent parts include Pomerantz Tableland, Daniels Range, Emlen Peaks, Helliwell Hills and Morozumi Range. Parts of these mountains were discovered and first photographed from aircraft of the U.S. Navy Operation Highjump, 1946-47. They were completely mapped by USGS from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960-63. The name is an acronym of the United States Antarctic Research Program, and was applied by US-ACAN in recognition of the accomplishments of that program in Antarctica.

Another view of the short (~100 feet high) calving front of Rennick Glacier

Crevasses on Rennick glacier with Bowers Mountains in background

Alvarez Glacier (70°53′S 162°20′E) is a tributary glacier in the Explorers Range of the Bowers Mountains in Antarctica. It flows from the southwest side of Stanwix Peak into Rennick Glacier, to the north of Sheehan Glacier. It was mapped by United States Geological Survey from surveys and U.S. Navy air photos, 1960–62, and was named by the Advisory Committee on Antarctic Names for Lieutenant Commander Jose A. Alvarez, Argentine Navy, an International Geophysical Year Weather Central meteorologist at Little America V in 1957.

Onlooker Nunatuk and the Gulfstream V winglet